Category Archives: Residential

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture

By | Architecture, Design, Residential | No Comments

Two commercial buildings in Winnipeg have been converted into an apartment block with mirrored balconies that stick out like open drawers.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

Constructed at the start of the twentieth century, the Hample and Avenue Buildings occupy a prominent position on Portage Avenue. They once housed shops and offices but had stood empty since the 1990s.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

The renovation by 5468796 Architecture involved upgrading the ground floor of both buildings for commercial use and adapting the upper floors to accommodate 75 rental apartments. At just three storeys, the Hample Building was half as tall as the Avenue Building, so the architects also added extra storeys to bring the two buildings into line.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

Steel balconies cantilever through existing window openings for 20 of the apartments. Each one is clad in mirrored aluminium and has a see-through gridded base.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

“A series of formally simple moves dramatically transform the original facades, shifting public perception of the buildings from eyesores to a unified urban landmark,” say the architects.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

At ground floor level, a mirrored canopy gives shelter to two different entrances. Stretching across the facade of both buildings, the volume is intended to unite the two structures.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

The first entrance leads though the glazed shopfront facade into the large ground floor unit, which is currently occupied by a charity organisation.

The Avenue on Portage by 5468796 Architecture
Photograph by James Brittain

The second entrance is dedicated to residents, who are led through a V-shaped recess into a stairwell at the centre of the building.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

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NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

London firm Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners has completed NEO Bankside, a set of six-sided apartment blocks beside the Tate Modern art gallery on the edge of the River Thames.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Like the Centre Pompidou and many other buildings designed by studio founder Richard Rogers, the four towers feature external bracing systems that form a steel diagrid across the facades.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

These supports carry the weight of each structure, preventing the need for load-bearing walls inside the building and in turn allowing flexible layouts on different floors.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

“A key feature is the external bracing, which allows a fantastic amount of flexibility inside the apartments,” explained Graham Stirk. “All the walls internally are non-structural, which means we have been able to open up the floor-to-ceiling space much higher than in a conventional apartment. That has enabled us to maximise daylight and the views.”

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The towers range from 12 to 24 storeys in height and all four feature balconies on the north and south elevations.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

“The four pavilions make up a family of buildings, a series of four towers of different heights bound by a very strong three-dimensional geometry,” said Stirk.

NEO Bankside by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

The exposed steel structure is also intended as a nod to the industrial heritage of the area, which was once home to a large oil-fired power station (now Tate Modern).

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

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Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

The walls of this house in Australia by architects McBride Charles Ryan have origami-like facets and folds.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

Located on the south coast, the holiday home is named after the Klein Bottle, which is the mathematical term for a surface with an indefinable left, right, top or bottom.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

Rooms angle around a central courtyard and step upwards to negotiate the inclining landscape.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

On the facade, outer surfaces are painted black while recesses are finished in different shades of white and pale grey.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

The residence was named best house at the 2011 World Architecture Festival Awards, which took place in Barcelona back in November.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

 

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

Photography is by John Gollings.

Here’s some more information about the project from McBride Charles Ryan:


Klein Bottle House

The Klein bottle is a descriptive model of a surface developed by topological mathematicians. Klein bottle, mobius strips, boy surfaces, unique surfaces that while they may be distorted remain topologically the same. I.e. a donut will remain topologically a donut if you twist and distort it, it will only change topologically if it is cut.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

The surfaces that mathematicians have developed hold intrigue for architects as they hold a promise of new spatial relationships and configurations. Technology (CAD) has played an important part in all this, it is now more possible to efficiently describe more complex shapes and spaces and communicate these to the build. Previously the more orthogonal means of communication – plans, sections and elevations naturally encourage buildings which are more easily described in these terms, i.e. boxes.

Klein Bottle House by McBride Charles Ryan

This holiday house is situated on the Mornington Peninsula 1.5 hrs drive from Melbourne. It is located within the tee–tree on the sand dunes, a short distance from the wild 16th beach. From the outset MCR wanted a building that nestled within the tree line. That talked about journey and the playfulness of holiday time. What began as a spiral or shell like building developed into a more complex spiral, the Klein bottle. MCR were keen to be topologically true to the Klein bottle but it had to function as a home. We thought an origami version of the bottle would be achievable and hold some ironic fascination. (The resulting FC version also has a comforting relationship to the tradition of the Aussie cement sheet beach house).